Search this site or the web powered by FreeFind

Site search
Web search

Index
Home
Departments
Teachers
Students
Parents
High School
Middle School
Primary School
Administration
Contact Us
Sponsorship
Test Taking
Student Resources
Additional Tip Sites
TestTakingTips.com
Study Guides
Teens Health
TeacherVision
Great Tests
APICS
Online Reference For Test Preparation
Kids Health
Study.com
Khan Academy
Online Videos
Classroom Videos
YouTube
WatchKnowLearn
Khan Academy
Guidance
Guidance
Test Taking
Test Taking
Students
Student Resources
Classroom Resources
Class Resources
Administration
Administration
Some graphics reproduced using Print Shop Deluxe, Broderbund Software, Inc. All Rights Reserved used by permission.
The Classroom does not claim all descriptions of sites to be their own words.

The Classroom  makes no promises or representations about the gadgets on this site as to quality. content or  performance

Test Taking Tips

GuidanceThe method by which students are analyzed to judge the performance  and achievements of any student as an individual or as a group. Educators often refer to what psychologist call psychometrics to judge the accuracy of their results. Numbers are assigned to characteristics such as performance, achievement, traits, intelligence, aptitude, attitudes and interest.
Remember it is only a test. Your world will not end, for failure is part of the learning process. Learn from the failures.
Get enough sleep before the test. Don't take stimulates, such as caffeine to keep you awake.
 Come prepared! Bring  pencils or a pen (which ever is required), paper, notes (if it is open notes), textbook (if it is open book) and a calculator (if it is allowed in a math test).
Read the directions carefully. Be sure you understand how the test needs be done and how it will be graded. If you don't understand something, ask the teacher to explain.
Read the test and answer the familiar questions. Then return and work on the unfamiliar questions.
Eliminate any answers you know are absolutely wrong then concentrate on the remaining.
If you don't understand a question raise your hand and ask the teacher for clarification.
Reread the test for any errors, such as erasures or misinterpretations.
When you get the test back check it for grading errors. If you find one, mention it politely to your teacher. Be prepared to justify what you found. You might also want to correct your wrong answers.
Essay Tests: Focus on the question.
Essay examinations can be short answer questions or long general questions. Essay tests do not have an exact answer key. They are usually scored on the logic and completeness of the answer, although there will be certain facts expected in the answer. The number one reason students fail essay tests is because they don't answer the questions completely and specifically, and because their answers are not well-organized, not because they cannot write.
Source: English Zone
Look at the key words such as "describe" "compare and contrast" "explain" "outline" "list" "discuss" each one requires different answers and is graded differently.
Make a thumb nail outline on the margins to organize your thoughts.
Don't ramble or repeat yourself. Stick to the point and don't be afraid to give an answer.
Don't be afraid to make a guess. You might just get some points!
Make your handwriting readable.
Additional Tips: Preparing for Essay Tests English Zone.com
Matching questions: Don't be fooled or tricked
Definition: A test in which students are presented with a question or an incomplete sentence or idea. The students are expected to choose the correct or best answer/completion from a menu of alternatives.
Source: Assessment Terminology
  Answer the questions you know are right and eliminate them from the list.
  Make an educated guess with the remaining questions and answers
  Be aware some teachers can use the same answers more than once.
When confused about a question ask the teacher for a clarification.
Multiple Choice, Four Part Question: Think before answering
  Answer the questions you know are right first and eliminate them from the list.
  If you can not figure out the correct answer, use B or C. Studies show that in teacher made tests, 60% of the time either of these two are likely the correct answer.
  Many times the longest answer is the correct one, since teachers often lift statements from the book.
  In a teacher made test, if two answers are the exact opposite then one of the two will probably be the correct answer.
  In a teacher made test, if one of the answers is unique or odd, it stands a good chance of being wrong.
The answer is wrong when you have a disagreement between the subject in a question and a verb answer (example if the subject is plural and an answer is singular).
Multiple Choice Five Part Questions : Not all answers are created equal!
  Answer the questions you know are right first and eliminate them from the list.
  If you can not figure out the correct answer use E. Studies show that on teacher made tests E is the correct answer 4 out of 5 times.
  If the question has "all of the above" as E, and two answers are correct, then E is the answer.
In a teacher made test, if two answers are the exact opposite then one of the two will probably be the correct answer.
  In a teacher made test, if one of the answers is unique or odd, it stands a good chance of being wrong.
  When you have a disagreement between the subject in a question and a verb answer, then that answer is wrong (example if subject is plural and an answer is singular).
Additional Tips: Multiple Choice Test Taking Tips
True False Questions: Learn to tell the difference from fact and fiction! Definition:  test in which statements are to be marked either true or false. Source: Answers.com
  If any part of a question is false then the whole question is false.
  If it doesn't make sense then it is probably false.
  When absolutes are used (always, never, only etc.), then the question is probably false.
  When qualifying words such as sometimes, possibly, may, etc., are used then the question is often true.
Additional Tips: Test Taking Tips
Fill in the Blanks Questions: Don't be shy to answer!
Definition:
Based on or being a test of reading comprehension in which the test taker is asked to supply words that have been systematically deleted from a text. Source:
Answers.com
Think the statement through.
Try inserting different words. If it looks awkward try another.
Short Answer Questions: Stick to the point!
A lot like the essay questions except you are asked to limit your answers to a brief statement.
Keep your answer concise and to the point.
A note from experience. Your first answer is usually the correct answer.
Remember that the above should be used when you don't know the answer and are not penalized for guessing!
Some excerpted from Jan D. Kelly, "Be a Master Magician: Taking Objective Examinations" in The Study Skills Circus, Georgia State University, pp 80-88
Some excerpts from Thomas J. Baerwald and Celeste Fraser, "Good Study Habits" Prentice Hall  World Geography.